Jordon & Dion

Jordon and Dion survived their brother Courtney after being born at 24 weeks. Their mother Tracey tells us their moving story and shares their aspirations for the future…

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On the 13th October 1995 at 24 weeks, I gave birth to spontaneous triplets at Edgware Hospital. Dion weighed 1lb 12oz, Jordon 1lb 9oz and Courtney 1lb 13oz. Sadly our beloved Courtney passed away 12hrs later due to his lung collapsing. Our boys stayed in the neonatal unit for 3 months where the doctors and nurses were fantastic. The road was rocky with the boys experiencing hernias, infections, jaundice, brain bleeds and blood transfusions. They currently live at home with me and their sister, Jade, who is 20 and at University studying Media Arts and our golden retriever Bailey. Their father has remarried and has a supporting and loving relationship with them. The whole family, nannies and granddad have been very helpful and supportive with their upbringing.

 Dion had various special needs and was under speech, occupational and physical therapy. He went to main stream school but found it difficult as he had moderate learning and speech difficulties and was moved to a special needs school. At 17 and 6ft tall he’s studying Public Service at college. He is a loving and caring young man and wants to be a fireman. He enjoys sports, going to the gym, using his computer and playing on his xbox. He has won his Duke of Edinburg bronze award and has a Btec sports Level 1. He no longer needs an inhaler and due to an infection when he was a baby likes the fact he has no belly button.

Jordon Has always been a chatter box and loves playing sports. He used an inhaler but no longer requires it. At 17 he is 5ft 11" tall and he is boarding at a basketball academy while doing his Btec sports Level 2. He loves to dance and enjoys listening to music. Jordon aspires to play basketball in America and hopes to train to be a coach. He holds a place in Great Ormond Street Hospitals' medical journal as the youngest baby with the biggest hernia, which is described as being the size of a small melon.

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